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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 42-45

Comparison of efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine versus propofol infusion for maintaining depth of general anesthesia when muscle relaxants are not used


Department of Anaesthesia, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sunil Rajan
Department of Anaesthesiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/BJOA.BJOA_6_20

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Background: In surgeries where direct nerve stimulation is required intraoperatively, the use of long-acting muscle relaxants should be avoided. The study aimed to assess the efficacy of dexmedetomidine versus propofol infusion in providing an adequate depth of general anesthesia where long-acting muscle relaxants were not used intraoperatively and to compare hemodynamics in both the groups. Patients and Methods: It was a prospective randomized controlled study done in forty patients undergoing total parotidectomy or brachial plexus surgeries. Group D received an intravenous (IV) bolus of dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/kg body weight before induction, followed by infusion at 0.7 mcg/kg/h intraoperatively. In Group B, the infusion of propofol was started at a rate of 1.5 mg/kg/h to a maximum of 100 mg/h after intubation. In both the groups, if the patient moved, bucked on the endotracheal tube, or if there were signs of inadequate depth of anesthesia, a bolus of propofol 0.5 mg/kg IV was given and repeated as required. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann–Whitney U-test and Fisher's exact test. Results: The number of times propofol bolus was required intraoperatively did not show any significant difference between groups. The mean heart rate was significantly lower in Group D before induction. At any other time points, the mean systolic blood pressure and mean arterial blood pressure were comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: Both dexmedetomidine and propofol infusions are equally effective and safe in providing an adequate depth of general anesthesia as reflected by patient immobility during surgeries where long-acting muscle relaxants were not used.


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